Indigenous & Remote Health: Full Program

Pre-Conference Workshop Monday 29 July 2019  

 

Indigenous Suicide Prevention and Youth Mental Health Facilitated by 

Put your learnings into practice and register for this workshop as part of your conference package! 
 
Suicide prevention is a priority public health concern integral to improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and overall livelihood in Australia.  This interactive workshop promotes meaningful reduction of the national suicide rate by sharing techniques and strategies on how to seek help and support others to seek help in line with Lifeline Australia’s crisis support and suicide prevention services.  
 
Topics to be covered: 
  • Reducing indigenous suicide rates and improve mental wellness by raising awareness about key areas of concern identified by indigenous communities
  • Creating culturally appropriate programs and safe spaces to prevent indigenous suicide that are suitable for practical implementation in urban and rural communities
  • Learn to listen without judgement, to provide connection, compassion and hope and ultimately save lives 
 

Agenda

 
9:00 Crisis support and suicide prevention 
10:15 Morning break 
10:45 How to empower family and community to provide guidance 
11:30 Tools and sources available to assist with suicide prevention 
12:15 Discussion  
 
13:00 Networking lunch  
 
14:00 Indigenous youth mental health: Can traditional Aboriginal ways of creating good health close the gap in the 21 century? 
  • Create and sustain physical and mental health and resilience for individuals and the community through unique Aboriginal approaches 
  • Learn about leadership, well-being, hygiene, nutrition, environmental health and health literacy 
  • Empower young people taking control of their health destiny 
Don Palmer, CEO, The Malpa Project 
Deborah Palmer
, Director of Curriculum and School Engagement, The Malpa Project 
 
14:45 Child Doctors: an ancient Aboriginal solution for the 21st century 
  • Shape the future mental health of Aboriginal families and communities 
  • Apply knowledge from the traditional healers of Central Australia to modern healthcare programs 
  • Find out how The Malpa Project has trained 2,000 Young Doctors across Australia’s rural, remote and urban settings 
Jayde Milburn, Project Leader, The Malpa Project 
Brett Summers, Project Leader, The Malpa Project 
Sara Dennis, Project Leader, The Malpa Project 
Eleazar Newchurch-Papillo, Project Leader, The Malpa Project 
 
15:30 Discussion 
 
16:00 End of Workshop
 

Workshop Facilitator  

 
 
Rachel Bowes, Acting Executive Director of Operations and Development, Lifeline Australia 
 
Rachel Bowes is the Acting Executive Director of Operations and Development at Lifeline Australia.  She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Registered Nursing, Nursing Administration, Nursing Research and Clinical Nursing from the University of Leeds and a Bachelor’s Degree in Registered Nursing from Kings College London.  She has held previous positions as the Clinical Governance Facilitator and Clinical Team Manager at Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust and as the Clinical Governance Manager at Medibank. 

08:30

08:50

09:00

CLOSING THE GAP ON INDIGENOUS HEALTH – WORKING WITH COMMUNITIES  

09:10

  • Understand the latest approaches to community engagement  
  • Identify effective ways that leaders can work with government, healthcare providers, and other stakeholders  
  • Create and sustain meaningful dialogue to ensure communities are respected and critical needs are being addressed  

 

ADDRESSING THE INDIGENOUS GAP IN THE WORKFORCE AND MAKING MEDICAL SERVICES CULTURALLY APPROPRIATE  

10:00

  • Increase indigenous participation in the healthcare workforce  
  • Employ recruitment practices to attract more indigenous workers into the health sector 
  • Create culturally safe work spaces and training pathways to develop lifetime opportunities for indigenous healthcare expertise and leadership

10:50

11:20

 

  • Yarning Circle One: Child health and learning from effective early intervention programs to ensure a lifetime of better health outcomes  
Ian Eggins, Director, Connecting Culture 

  • Yarning Circle Two: Disability care and how to improve the accessibility and effectiveness of NDIS for indigenous Australians  
Jamie Newman, CEO, Orange Aboriginal Medical Service 
Michael Ruddy, NDIS Coordinator, Orange Aboriginal Medical Service

  • Yarning Circle Three: Promoting lifelong health and wellbeing through physical activity programs 
Paul Douglas, Manager Aboriginal Health, Western NSW Local Health District 

  • Yarning Circle Four: Improving integrated aged care 
Toby Dawson, Foundation Manager, Illawarra Retirement Trust Group 
Bunja Smith
, CEO, Bumberung Aboriginal Corporation 

 

01:00

02:00

 

  • Create culturally appropriate and easy-to-understand resources to support health workers and improve patient empowerment within communities   
  • Evaluate Feltman and Feltman training and learn how to apply this to your programs 
  • Learn how to implement a similar program in the communities you serve 

 

02:50

MAKING MENTAL HEALTH A PRIORITY AND IMPLEMENTING EFFECTIVE SUICIDE PREVENTION STRATEGIES  

03:20

  • Attract funding and raise the profile of suicide prevention campaigns  
  • Identify risk factors to effectively target vulnerable individuals and reduce indigenous suicide rates 
  • Learn from effective early intervention programs to implement successful suicide prevention methods 

04:10

 

 

  • Understand the determinants that place certain indigenous individuals at risk of mental health problems 
  • Find out about the RULER approach to better mental health 
  • Create strategies to implement effective well-being programs in indigenous and isolated communities 

 

 

04:50

05:00

08:30

OVERCOMING FUNDING OBSTACLES 

09:00

09:10

  • Learn how to diversify service delivery to ensure engagement levels are maintained, improved and essential funding is ensured 
  • Learn from new and existing programs that merge broader indigenous well-being initiatives with health-related goals  
  • Engage other organisations in the community to relieve pressure on resources and promote overall indigenous well-being  

09:50

 

  • Enhance the reputation and credibility of indigenous health programs  
  • Engage with research institutes to form mutually beneficial partnerships and increase the viability and effectiveness of new programs 
  • Implement self-sustaining evaluation procedures that are well-received by investors 

 

10:30

11:00

 

  • Incorporate family and community to assist in the healing of affected individuals  
  • Reduce the broader social impact of substance abuse  
  • Adopt a holistic approach to drug and alcohol recovery through lessons learned from NSW’s Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Health Network (ADAN) to create lasting positive impact on indigenous communities

 

HOUSING  

11:30

  • Understand the impact substandard housing & homelessness have on health outcomes 
  • Learn from the best housing and environmental health programs being implemented across the country 
  • Identify the unique cultural, community, and family circumstances of First Nations peoples in order to create appropriate housing strategies to meet the needs of those outside of conventional living norms

12:20

01:20

Each roundtable discussion will run for 45 minutes, after which participants will rotate to the next roundtable. 

 

  • Yarning Circle One: Promoting hygiene, health and well-being through physical activity programs 
Nicki Bardwell, CEO, Fairgame Australia Limited 

  • Yarning Circle Two: Improving long-term health outcomes through diet and holistic nutrition  
Mikaela Egan, Aboriginal Nutrition Promotion Officer, VACCHO 

  • Yarning Circle Three: Facilitating traditional healing programmes 
Dr Francesca Panzironi, CEO, Anangu Ngangkari Tjutaku Aboriginal Corporation 

 

02:50

PAST AND FUTURE: USING TRADITIONAL HEALING AND MODERN TECHNOLOGY TO ADVANCE INDIGENOUS HEALTH OUTCOMES  

03:20

 

  • Create strategic partnerships with third parties for greater reach of effective traditional healing programs 
  • Overcome barriers to transfer local programs into other states 
  • Manage existing resources to expand an indigenous healing program on a national level without reliance upon government funding 

 

04:00

 

 

 

  • Enable Aboriginal traditionl healers to work with health professionals in hospitals and primary healthcare facilities 
  • Provide an essential service for physical, emotional and cultural health and wellbeing 
  • Ngangkari traditional healing methods in NALHN 

 

 

 

04:30

04:40